Progressive Overload Principle



Progressive overload benefits your training because you’ll avoid a plateau, you’ll keep your muscles challenged and you’ll get stronger…you’ll grow! Click here to download the principles!


Increasing Resistance

Adding more weight breaks down muscles to rebuild and get stronger. Before moving up in weight, you should master the movement and form as well as be comfortable lifting 8 - 12 reps. Rest 1 or 2 days between lifting to give your body time to recover.

Example:

  • Week 1 - Perform bicep curls with 10- or 12-pound weights.

  • Week 4 - Perform bicep curls with 12- or 15-pound weights.

  • Week 8 - Perform bicep curls with 15- or 18-pound weights.

Increase Endurance

For strength training, try doing a higher number of reps with a lower weight. Before increasing the number of repetitions spend a few weeks mastering the exercise. For cardiovascular endurance, you can gradually increase the length of your cardio exercise sessions. Rest for 1 or 2 days before your next strength or cardio workout.

Example:

  • Week 1 - Run 20 minutes at a light to moderate pace, 2 days per week.

  • Week 3 - Run 30 minutes at a light to moderate pace, 2 days per week.

  • Week 5 - Run 30–40 minutes at a light to moderate pace, 3 days per week.

Increase Repetitions

This puts more demand on your muscles which strengthens them over time.

  • Week 1 - Perform 10–12 squats, with or without weight.

  • Week 3 - Perform 12–15 squats, with or without weight.

  • Week 5 - Perform 15 squats, with or without weight.

Increase Tempo

Work at a quicker pace or with less rest time in between sets.


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